One of the many problems freelancers or small, one to three person agencies is communication. Perhaps it’s because most communication platforms are designed for larger teams.

That’s why I wanted to share how slack improved our team communication.

Maybe the communication platform(s) you use are inefficient, for example, iMessage.

Have you ever tried to search for a conversation in iMessage? Geez, it’s brutal.

With so many channels of communication (and people with different preferences), it can be challenging to ensure nothing falls through the cracks. We’ve regularly had this issue.

We tried using Asana, which we use as a Project Management tool, but it just became cluttered when we were having conversations on a particular project.

Enter Slack.

Have you heard of Slack?

I’m sure you’ve either tried or heard of Slack by now.

As leaders in the communication space, the $5 Billion valuation puts them up there with the largest companies in the world.

Slack simplifies communication while connecting you with teammates as well as other apps.

If you haven’t experienced Slack before, check out their guides here.

It’s pretty simple, really.

Create channels for new projects and share all necessary information in that specific channel. Notes? Check. GIFs? Check.

The free version of Slack is more than powerful enough to help bring together all team members to communicate effectively and efficiently.

It also will, hopefully, keep those late night text messages from keeping you awake.

How to organize your Slack channels

Organizing your Slack channels largely depends on the size of your team and the amount of communication back and forth.

I have found it to be more sufficient to simply create channels for each particular project.

For example, the channel list would look like this:

#abc-company
#def-company
#xyz-company

In each company channel you can upload documents, photos, or other files as well as communicate with any designers or developers that may be working on the project.

The search function in Slack makes it very simple to find the files uploaded or conversation had.

What about phone calls or emails?

For phone calls, just take notes in the channel or on your personal feed, then copy them over after the meeting.

Emails? There are also integrations for this, but sometimes less integration is better. I realize that may be unpopular, but some things just aren’t meant to work together.

There are quite a few different integration options with other apps (check them out here), but I’ve found most integrations just clutter up the channel(s).

I’m all about automation, but I’m also about simplicity. If it simplifies our business and saves time, we’ll use it. Otherwise, focusing on automating everything can turn your whole process into a big mess.

As the saying goes, “think less, do more”.

Conclusion

If you haven’t tried Slack, you can sign up here, it’s free! I do not receive a commission for recommending Slack, I simply think it’s a useful tool to communicate with team members.

If you’re able to try it with your team, make sure as much communication is done through Slack.

What do you think about Slack? Do you use or recommend alternatives?

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